The Picture of Dorian Gray (with an Essay by Jules Barbey D'Aurevilly) PDF eBook By Oscar Wilde



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Title: The Picture of Dorian Gray (with an Essay by Jules Barbey D'Aurevilly)
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Author: Oscar Wilde
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Read Book The Picture of Dorian Gray (with an Essay by Jules Barbey D'Aurevilly)

Perhaps the book that created the most general discussion and criticism at this period was "The Picture of Dorian Gray," which appeared originally in Lippincott's Magazine in July, 1890, as the complete novel for that issue... Wilde at first demurred on the ground that he had not tried his hand on a long and sustained story, but fi nally gave his consent. The story seems t Perhaps the book that created the most general discussion and criticism at this period was "The Picture of Dorian Gray," which appeared originally in Lippincott's Magazine in July, 1890, as the complete novel for that issue... Wilde at first demurred on the ground that he had not tried his hand on a long and sustained story, but fi nally gave his consent. The story seems to have simmered in his mind for some time, though after he had once begun it, it was quickly completed. Wilde has himself said that he wrote it in a few days. --- In a preface to this story, written for a later edition in book form, Mr. Basil Ward, the artist, tells of the genesis of the story. It goes back to the year 1884, when Oscar Wilde was often in Mr. Ward's studio. One of Mr. Ward's sitters was a young man of such peculiar beauty that his friends had nicknamed him "The Radiant Youth." Each afternoon Wilde watched the work advance, enchanting everybody meanwhile with brilliant talk, until at last the portrait was fi nished and its original had gone his way - rejoicing, without doubt, to be at liberty. "What a pity," sighed Wilde, "that such a glorious creature should ever grow old!" - "Yes, it is indeed," answered Mr. Ward. "How delightful it would be if 'Dorian' could remain exactly as he is while the portrait aged and withered in his stead. I wish it might be so!" - And that was all. "I occupied myself," says Mr. Ward, "with the picture for perhaps a quarter of an hour, during which Wilde smoked refl ectively, but uttered not one word. He arose presently and sauntered to the door, merely nodding as he left the room." Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly

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